• Supreme Court adopts new rules for cellphone tracking

    23 days ago - By KCRA

    The Supreme Court has ruled that the government generally needs a warrant if it wants to track an individual's location through cell phone records over an extended period of time.
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  • WATCH: Supreme Court rules that police generally need a warrant to access cell phone data

    WATCH: Supreme Court rules that police generally need a warrant to access cell phone data

    23 days ago - By ABC News

    The Supreme Court ruled that police need a search warrant to review cell phone records that include data like a user's location.
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  • A Historic Victory for Privacy

    23 days ago - By Slate

    On Friday, in a far-reaching decision, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that law enforcement must generally get a warrant in order to obtain an individual's cell site location information-that is, records of every place your phone has been. The court's decision dramatically both expands the scope of the FourthAmendment and updates it for modern times, providing new and robust constitutional safeguards to the right to privacy. Indeed, the court's decision in Carpenter v. United States may be the most important FourthAmendment ruling of the 21 st century so far.
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  • Should Law Enforcement Need a Warrant to Track Your Cell Phone?

    23 days ago - By Scientific American

    In Carpenter v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court is about to tackle its biggest case related to the Fourth Amendment and privacy of data generated by cell phones
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  • Supreme Court rules that police need warrants to get phone location info

    Supreme Court rules that police need warrants to get phone location info

    23 days ago - By iMore

    The decision was ruled in favor with a 5-4 vote.
    The United States Supreme Court issued a ruling on June 22 stating that police must first get an official warrant before they can use cell tower data to track someone's location.
    This ruling comes from the Carpenter v. United States case that dates back six years to 2011. Timothy Carpenter was arrested for a robbery in Detroit during that year, but only after police tracked down 12,898 locations of Carpenter over the course of 127 days. However, the police obtained all this data without any sort of warrant.
    With the June 22 decision from the...
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  • In Major Privacy Win, Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant To Track Your Cellphone

    In Major Privacy Win, Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant To Track Your Cellphone

    23 days ago - By NPR

    The Supreme Court ruled police do need a search warrant to obtain cellphone location information routinely collected by wireless providers.
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  • Supreme Court rules that warrant is needed to access cell tower records

    23 days ago - By The Washington Post

    The government had argued there is no privacy in information knowingly transmitted to a third party.
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  • Police need warrant for cell phone location data, SCOTUS rules

    Police need warrant for cell phone location data, SCOTUS rules

    23 days ago - By RT

    The US Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a defendant challenging the government's use of his cellphone location information without a warrant.
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  • U.S. Supreme Court Bolsters Mobile-Phone Privacy Rights

    23 days ago - By Bloomberg

    Law enforcement officials need a warrant to get mobile-phone tower records that show someone's location over an extended period, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a decision that bolsters digital privacy rights.
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  • Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant To Get Location Information From Cell Towers

    23 days ago - By NPR

    The Supreme Court ruled police do need a search warrant to obtain cell-phone location information routinely collected by wireless providers.
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  • Supreme Court rules police typically need warrants to access cell phone location info

    23 days ago - By Politico

    The Supreme Court has ruled that police typically need a search warrant before trying to track a person's movements via their cell phone. Chief Justice John Roberts joined his four Democratic appointees in the decision , continuing an expansion by the Roberts court of privacy rights in a digital age. Roberts' majority opinion says police must get a warrant in "mine-run" criminal cases, but could access such information without a warrant in an emergency.
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